Living off the Land | Agriculture in Wales c. 400 - 1600 AD

Windgather Press

Living off the Land | Agriculture in Wales c. 400 - 1600 AD

Pris arferol £34.99
Pris Uned  per 
Treth yn gynwysedig. Cyfrif cludiant yn y man talu.

ISBN: 9781911188391
Dyddiad Cyhoeddi: 31 Hydref 2019
Cyhoeddwr: Windgather Press, Rhydychen
Golygwyd gan Rhiannon Comeau, Andy Seaman
Fformat: Clawr Meddal, 247x186 mm, 264 tudalen
Iaith: Saesneg

Dyma'r llyfr cyntaf ers cenhedlaeth i drafod amaethyddiaeth ganoloesol yng Nghymru. Cyflwynir tystiolaeth o berthnasedd sylweddol ar gyfer y rheini sy'n astudio datblygiad tirweddau canoloesol cynnar ym Mhrydain ac Iwerddon. Lluniau a mapiau niferus.

Gwybodaeth Bellach:
This collection of essays confronts the paradox that, though agriculture lay at the heart of medieval society, understanding of what this meant for Wales remains limited. The papers address key questions that include: how did the agricultural systems of Wales operate between c. 400 and 1600 AD? How similar or different was Wales to other areas of Britain and Ireland? Can we identify change over time? How do we go about researching early Welsh agriculture? These issues are explored through new syntheses and case studies focused on Wales, and contextualising overviews of medieval agricultural systems in Ireland and England written by leading experts. Themes covered include the use of infield-outfield systems, seasonal land use and its impact on territorial and estate structures, and regional variation, all explored using a wide array of complementary multidisciplinary approaches. Welsh law s provisions relating to agriculture receive specific consideration. The introduction, written by the editors Rhiannon Comeau and Andy Seaman, gives context to the historiography, key debates, themes and issues surrounding the topic. Contributors include both established authorities and newer scholars: David Austin, Rhiannon Comeau, Tudur Davies, Andrew Fleming, Della Hooke, Thomas R. Kerr, Meriel McClatchie, Finbar McCormick, Aidan O Sullivan, Stephen Rippon, Sara Elin Roberts, Andy Seaman and Bob Silvester. The book includes a glossary of terms and a bibliography of key Welsh work.